Saturday, October 16, 2010

Pegasus Visits Mystic




The only thing I love more than an old sailing ship is an old tug. So when the tugboat Pegasus visited Mystic Seaport this Columbus Day weekend, I made sure to stop by. Built in 1907 for the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, she was known as a "battleship tug" because of her size and power. When purchased by McAllistar in 1953, she was converted from steam to diesel power, and served the ports of Boston, New York, and Norfolk. She retired in 1997 after a 90 year career, and is now being restored by the Pegasus Preservation Project.
When I arrived, Captain Pamela Hepburn and her crew were just finishing up their third and final day of providing tours aboard the Pegasus. This may sound like easy work, but it can also be demanding. The sunny weather brought large crowds to the Seaport this holiday weekend, and standing for 9 hours in an engine room answering the same questions repeatedly is tiring work. Congratulations to the volunteer crew for a job well done.
As luck would have it, I was invited to join them for some food and grog at a nearby restaurant. Though tired, the crew was great company, and I enjoyed having the opportunity to meet them and share a few laughs. There was a wealth of maritime knowledge sitting at that table, and I promised to keep in touch as I said goodbye and wished them well on their trip back to New York Harbor the following morning.


Tug Pegasus Preservation Project
Tugster: Mystic Weekend
Tugster: A New York Harbor Waterblog
Mystic Seaport

4 comments:

tugster said...

matt-- nice job, and thanks.

Erica Houskeeper said...

What a beautiful tugboat - nice shots! I am amazed that she has been around since 1907. Sounds like you had a fun day with the crew.

Larry said...

Great tugboat photos!I really like Mystic-I think I'll go back during the winter with my wife for a day or two.

matthew houskeeper said...

Glad you liked it Larry. I always prefer a town that is accessible and walkable over a self contained resort like Saybrook Pt.